Teachers’ professional needs are important issues to be addressed in social dialogue in the education sector. Education trade unions are key actors in protecting the right of teachers to professional development, concluded the participants of the ETUCE Public Hearing ‘Supporting teachers in the European Education Area 2025: The role of education trade unions in meeting teachers’ professional needs’ in Brussels on 19 September 2018.

More than 30 delegates representing 22 European countries attended the biannual meeting of the ETUCE Higher Education and Research Standing Committee (HERSC) which took place on 10-11 September 2018 in Tallinn, Estonia. The meeting was organised with the support of the ETUCE member organisation in Estonia, UNIVERSITAS.

On 19 September from 9.00 – 13.00, ETUCE organises a Public Hearing ‘Supporting teachers in the European Education Area 2025: The role of education trade unions in meeting teachers’ professional needs’ which takes place in in the premises of the International Trade Union House, The International Auditorium (1st floor), Boulevard Roi Albert II 5, 1210, Brussels.

The Spanish ETUCE member organisation FE.CCOO  and FELGTB, the Spanish Federation of Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual and Transsexual people, have presented a guideline targeted at adolescent students, teachers and families about raising awareness of sexual and gender affective diversity. These guidelines were presented as various stories in a comic format with an emphasis on gender diverse characters in order to draw attention to the importance of creating a safe environment in schools for LGBT individuals.

The report of the Joint Research Centre of the European Commission ‘Can digital technologies help reduce the migrant-native educational achievement gap?’ (2018) explores the access to digital technologies of 15 year olds and whether digital technologies can have an impact in decreasing the educational achievement gap between students from a migrant background and native students.

A recent EU Fundamental Rights Agency’s report on ‘Transition from Education to Employment of Young Roma in Nine EU Member States’ (July 2018) explores the factors that are holding Roma back from receiving a good education and jobs. The analysis (2011-2017) focuses on nine EU Member States: Bulgaria, Croatia, the Czech Republic, Greece, Hungary, Portugal, Romania, Slovakia and Spain.